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Posts tagged Mermaids

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vilajunkie:

Lutey and the Mermaid
"Long ago Lutey of Cury, near Lizard Point, a Cornish fisherman and wrecker, was combing the beach for jetsam when he found a beautiful mermaid stranded in a pool by the receding tide. She persuaded him to carry her down to the sea. As they went she offered him three wishes, and he chose those he thought would do good: the power to break the spells of witchcraft and to compel familiar spirits for the good of others, and that these powers should descend in his family. She granted these, and because he had wished unselfishly said that none of his family should come to want, and gave him her comb by which he could summon her. Then, as they grew near the sea, the more sinister side of her nature showed itself. She began to allure him to go with her, and tightened her grasp on his neck. So great were her allurements that he would have gone with her, but his dog howled to him from the shore, and he saw his own cottage where his wife and children lived, and told her to let him go. Even so she clung to him, and would have pulled him down, but he flashed his knife in her face, and, presumably repelled by the iron, she plunged into the sea, calling, ‘Farewell my sweet, for nine long years, then I’ll come for thee my love.’
"The mermaid was as good as her word, and for generations the Luteys of Cury were famous healers, and prospered by their art. The first Lutey, however, only enjoyed his powers for nine years, for at the end of that time, when he was out in his boat with one of his sons, a beautiful woman rose out of the sea and called him. ‘My hour is come,’ he said, and he plunged into the water, never to be seen again. And they say that ever after, every nine years, one of his descendants was lost in the sea. This is the grimmer version given by [William] Bottrell from the narrative of a wandering droll-teller in The Traditions and Hearthside Stories of West Cornwall (vol. 1). The mermaid in [Robert] Hunt’s ‘Old Man of Cury’ is a less sinister character.”
Source: Briggs, Katharine M. “Lutey and the Mermaid.” An Encyclopedia of Fairies: Hobgoblins, Brownies, Bogies, and Other Supernatural Creatures. New York: Pantheon Books, 1976, pp. 274-5.

vilajunkie:

Lutey and the Mermaid

"Long ago Lutey of Cury, near Lizard Point, a Cornish fisherman and wrecker, was combing the beach for jetsam when he found a beautiful mermaid stranded in a pool by the receding tide. She persuaded him to carry her down to the sea. As they went she offered him three wishes, and he chose those he thought would do good: the power to break the spells of witchcraft and to compel familiar spirits for the good of others, and that these powers should descend in his family. She granted these, and because he had wished unselfishly said that none of his family should come to want, and gave him her comb by which he could summon her. Then, as they grew near the sea, the more sinister side of her nature showed itself. She began to allure him to go with her, and tightened her grasp on his neck. So great were her allurements that he would have gone with her, but his dog howled to him from the shore, and he saw his own cottage where his wife and children lived, and told her to let him go. Even so she clung to him, and would have pulled him down, but he flashed his knife in her face, and, presumably repelled by the iron, she plunged into the sea, calling, ‘Farewell my sweet, for nine long years, then I’ll come for thee my love.’

"The mermaid was as good as her word, and for generations the Luteys of Cury were famous healers, and prospered by their art. The first Lutey, however, only enjoyed his powers for nine years, for at the end of that time, when he was out in his boat with one of his sons, a beautiful woman rose out of the sea and called him. ‘My hour is come,’ he said, and he plunged into the water, never to be seen again. And they say that ever after, every nine years, one of his descendants was lost in the sea. This is the grimmer version given by [William] Bottrell from the narrative of a wandering droll-teller in The Traditions and Hearthside Stories of West Cornwall (vol. 1). The mermaid in [Robert] Hunt’s ‘Old Man of Cury’ is a less sinister character.”

Source: Briggs, Katharine M. “Lutey and the Mermaid.” An Encyclopedia of Fairies: Hobgoblins, Brownies, Bogies, and Other Supernatural Creatures. New York: Pantheon Books, 1976, pp. 274-5.

Filed under mermaids

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nadiaaboulhosn:

madamebutterfat:

My third mermaid. This is a fanart of one of my biggest girl-crushes and inspirations, nadiaaboulhosn.
My style is maturing, and since my last commission wasn’t a traditional mermaid, I have started expanding my style.
Nadi’s mermaid is based on a Mediterranean Rainbow Wrasse, a fish that lives near Lebanon, where her family is from. It’s colorful and exotic like her. I thought it would look nice. I’m pretty happy with it.
Please favorite on my DA.

omg this is amazing and the inspiration behind it is lovely! i really appreciate it bb! ur sooo talented. whats ur IG so i can tag u? xoxox

nadiaaboulhosn:

madamebutterfat:

My third mermaid. This is a fanart of one of my biggest girl-crushes and inspirations, nadiaaboulhosn.

My style is maturing, and since my last commission wasn’t a traditional mermaid, I have started expanding my style.

Nadi’s mermaid is based on a Mediterranean Rainbow Wrasse, a fish that lives near Lebanon, where her family is from. It’s colorful and exotic like her. I thought it would look nice. I’m pretty happy with it.

Please favorite on my DA.

omg this is amazing and the inspiration behind it is lovely! i really appreciate it bb! ur sooo talented. whats ur IG so i can tag u? xoxox

Filed under Nadia Aboulhosn mermaids